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Rosa Rugosa — 11 Comments

  1. This reminds me of my attempts to make rosehip jelly a couple of years ago – I got into one heck of a mess! I must admit that I haven’t done it again since. You’re obviously much more resilient than I am x

  2. A must in my garden too. One particularly prolific year, I used them instead of tomatoes in soup. Thanks for the reminder – I’m going to dig out the recipe.

  3. Sometimes see wild rose hips, usually growing in rather inaccessible areas. Noticed that RHS plant shop sells Rosa rugosa, so may treat myself to a shrub, the flowers are so pretty!

  4. Wonderful uses and all from one plant! I love rosehip tea. Do you ever put the rosehips into your tea? It’s a great source of Vitamin C and can add a lively tartness to any type of tea. With some honey to sweeten and balance the flavor, it’s delicious even when served as iced tea.

    I never would have thought of making jelly or wine from rosehips. I admit, I first thought they were a type of tomato from your pictures! How does the rosehip wine and jelly differ from others using different fruits?

    • D > What do you do to the hips to prepare them for tea-making? We’ve never done that. Rosehip jelly has a very complex fruity flavour, perhaps reminiscent of crab apples. Likewise for the wine.

      • I soak the coarsely split dried hips in very hot water for a few minutes and then add my brewed green or black tea. I always brew my green tea for 2 or 3 minutes so it’s not bitter. I add my honey while the tea is still hot and make sure to stir it all together while it’s still steaming. I like to drink my tea hot, but in the warm humid summers of the Midwestern US in Missouri, I prefer to add plenty of ice after refrigeration overnight in a large pitcher.

        I would love to try your rosehip jelly one day. It sounds like it would be lovely on American biscuits for breakfast with scrambled eggs or a cheese and vegetable omelet.

Your views are welcome!

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