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Rooftops and Chimneys — 11 Comments

  1. Beautiful pictures! I always enjoy seeing that great architecture.

    So that caption under the last picture means, “Long may your lamb stink,” right? Cuz I love the smell of lamb meat cooking, whether baked or in a soup.

    • J > Ha ha Sheila. No , it”s an old Scots proverb that means, Long May Your Chimney Smoke. It’s a well-wish by neighbours when you first light a fire after building a nrw chimney, moving into a house , or after building a house.

  2. I love seeing all the differences in the architecture. Great photos of the celebration. I would love to be at that party. Best of luck with all the repairs.

  3. Ah, a good fire wherever it may be always makes a house feel like home. That looks like it’s drawing well now. Loving your pottery on the mantle, btw!

    • J > Thanks Luffy. The attraction of a fire is universal. In Spanish, the word hogar means both fireplace and home. The pottery is very traditional Navarese-Basque. They came with the house – as did so much else.

      • I lived in the Basque region on the French side for some years. They value hearth, home and community in a way that much of the U.K. has sadly lost. Wishing you luck with your renovations

      • And I just love those ancient, often hand-made Roman roof tiles. Beautiful weathered colours and textures

        • J > Apart from a bit of mortar for the tiles at the verge, all the tiles are loose – no fixings at all. Obviously rain falls vertically, here, and no wind can be anything more than a brisk breeze! In the building permit for this work the term used for the tiles translates as ‘Arabs’.

          • That doesn’t surprise me. The old tiles in France were about three deep each with an interlocking overlapped one to hold them in place. No mortar either!

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